Center for Immigration Studies

Who We Are The Center for Immigration Studies is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit, research organization. Since our founding in 1985, we have pursued a single mission – providing immigration policymakers, the academic community, news media, and concerned citizens with reliable information about the social, economic, environmental, security, and fiscal consequences of legal and illegal immigration into the United States. The Center is governed by a diverse board of directors that has included active and retired university professors, civil rights leaders, and former government officials. Our research and analysis has been funded by contributions and grants from dozens of private foundations, from the U.S. Census Bureau and Justice Department, and from hundreds of generous individual donors. Our board, our staff, our researchers, and our contributor base are not predominantly "liberal" or predominantly "conservative." Instead, we believe in common that debates about immigration policy that are well-informed and grounded in objective data will lead to better immigration policies. The data collected by the Center during the past quarter-century has led many of our researchers to conclude that current, high levels of immigration are making it harder to achieve such important national objectives as better public schools, a cleaner environment, homeland security, and a living wage for every native-born and immigrant worker. These data may support criticism of US immigration policies, but they do not justify ill feelings toward our immigrant community. In fact, many of us at the Center are animated by a "low-immigration, pro-immigrant" vision of an America that admits fewer immigrants but affords a warmer welcome for those who are admitted.

Immigrant Gains and Native Losses In the Job Market, 2000 to 2013

Steven A. Camarota, and Karen Zeigler
July 9, 2013

In this Backgrounder at CIS, the authors note that while jobs are always being created and lost, and the number of workers rises and falls with the economy, a new analysis of government data shows

The Life of Julia, Amnesty Applicant

June 20, 2013

In May 2012, the Obama re-election campaign released a slideshow titled, "The Life of Julia" which promoted the idea that government programs and President Obama's agenda items were critical to the

Liberal Voices on Immigration and U.S. Workers

June 25, 2013

In this interview by CIS, the organization reveals two interviews highlighting liberal voices concerned about immigration’s impact on the American worker and income inequality.

CBO Projects the Gang of Eight Bill Fails to Stop Illegal Immigration

June 19, 2013

In this policy report from CIS, the argument is made that, the central purpose of the Schumer-Rubio bill (S.744) is to reduce future illegal immigration. In fact, Sen.

The Coming Conflict Over Asylum: Does America Need a New Asylum Policy

Don Barnett
March 1, 2002

In this Backgrounder, Don Barnett aserts that asylum remains one of the least understood policy issues in America today.

Get Tight: Now More than Ever, Immigration Should be Curtailed

Mark Krikorian
March 25, 2002

This op-ed originally in National Review, states that since Sept. 11, a new consensus appears to have developed on the need for tighter immigration enforcement and border controls.

Giving Cover to Illegal Aliens: IRS Tax ID Numbers Subvert Immigration Law

Marti Dinerstein
October 1, 2002

In this Backgrounder, the author asserts that through its issuance of Individual Tax Identification Numbers (ITINs), the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) appears to be blind or indifferent to the rea

Outsmarting Smart Growth: Population Growth, Immigration, and the Problem of Sprawl

Steven A. Camarota, Roy Beck, and Leon Kolankiewicz
August 1, 2003

In this Backgrounder, which received much public and news attention, the authors write that To date, almost all efforts to combat sprawl have focused on Smart Growth strategies, which primari

RICO: A New Tool for Immigration Law Enforcement

Micah King
August 1, 2003

In this Backgrounder, Micah King writes that Olivia Mendoza is an agricultural worker in Washington state’s fruit industry, and, while the fruit business in Washington is a billion-dollar-per-

Promise Unfulfilled: Why Didn’t Collective Bargaining Transform California’s Farm Labor Market?

Philip Martin
January 4, 2004
In this Backgrounder, the author examines California's attempt to unionize farm labor.
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