Recent Research & Commentary

Are Oklahoma's Noncompliant School Districts Violating Civil Rights Laws?

Stacy martin and Patrick B. McGuigan
January 3, 2011

Oklahoma public schools that violate the civil rights of students risk losing federal education funds, U.S. Department of Education official Jim Bradshaw told CapitolBeatOK recently.

That information may be of particular interest to advocates of, and families with, special-needs schoolchildren—the beneficiaries of a new state law intended to improve their educational options. While state money is involved in the new statute, federal civil rights provisions could still apply.

Research & Commentary: Idaho’s Tobacco Tax Advantage

December 20, 2010

Idaho is expected to face a budget deficit in fiscal year 2012 of approximately $350 million.

TN should say no to ObamaCare

Justin Owen
December 15, 2010

Nine months ago, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, ushering in the largest-ever government intrusion into American’s health-care decisions.

Research & Commentary: Georgia's Tobacco Tax Advantage

December 8, 2010

Georgia state Rep. Ron Stephens (R-Savannah) wants to raise the state’s cigarette tax by a dollar per pack in order to help close the state’s $1.5 billion budget deficit.

Research & Commentary: A Federal Balanced Budget Amendment

November 10, 2010

The current public outrage over bailouts, excessive spending, and a staggering national debt are helping fuel the push for a federal balanced budget amendment.

Research & Commentary: Jobs and the Health Care Law

Benjamin Domenech
November 9, 2010

There is little question that the key issue for most voters in November’s election was the economy.

How Higher Tuition Translates into More Debt for State Universities

Simon Wong
October 12, 2010

The S.C. Budget and Control Board recently announced a moratorium halting construction at four-year public institutions that raised tuition by 7 percent or more for the 2010-2011 school year.

The moratorium applies only to institutions that raised tuition by 7 percent or more. This means it does not apply to the University of South Carolina, which raised tuition by 6.9 percent. But it does apply to Clemson, which raised tuition by 7.5 percent.

So how is tuition connected to capital building projects?

Research & Commentary: The Problem with ‘Fat’ Taxes

October 6, 2010

States are increasingly looking to soda, candy, and other so-called “fat” taxes as a way to shore up their budgets.