Policy Briefs

The Prognosis for National Health Insurance: A Florida Perspective

Arduin, Laffer & Moore Econometrics, and foward by Robert F. Sanchez
September 1, 2009

Health care now comprises about one-sixth of the U.S. economy. Given the aging of the population, that portion is likely to grow. Therefore, making major changes in the system that delivers and funds health care requires especially careful analysis, not a rush to judgment.

Reforming Medicaid in Florida

Dr. Michael Bond
March 25, 2010

Medicaid, the joint Federal-State program that was created to provide health care for the poor, celebrated its 40

Solutions to Restore Florida’s Property Insurance Marketplace to Protect Taxpayers and the Insured

Eli Lehrer
February 4, 2011

The 2011 session of the Florida Legislature will convene in the midst of state budget worries, a lingering real estate crisis, and a still-sluggish national economy. Therefore, lawmakers will face a challenging series of problems that a single legislative session will be hard-pressed to solve.

Obamacare for CT to Bust Budget

Marc Kilmer

In 2009, the Connecticut General Assembly overrode a veto by Governor Jodi Rell and passed an ambitious health care proposal called SustiNet. The dramatic final vote came after a years long campaign funded by tens of millions of dollars by the Universal Health Care Foundation of Connecticut. The bill created a state commission to develop a plan to expand government health care and report back to the legislature in 2011.

How Much Does Each Diploma Cost?

June 14, 2010

HARTFORD – The average Connecticut high school graduate cost taxpayers about $133,000 from kindergarten through senior year, according to new research by the Yankee Institute. For high school graduates in the city of Hartford, which has the state’s most expensive graduates, that figure climbed to just under $200,000 per graduate, the data shows.

Using data from the Connecticut Department of Education, the Yankee Institute has ranked every Connecticut public high school by the lifetime cost of education per graduate. The five most expensive and least expensive diplomas are:

The Economics of Climate Change Proposals in Wisconsin

David G. Tuerck, Ph.D., Paul Bachman, MSIE, Sarah Glassman, MSEP, Michael Head, MSEP
November 1, 2009

Executive Summary

In April 2007, Wisconsin Gov. Jim Doyle signed Executive Order 191 establishing the Governor’s Task Force on Global Warming (GTF).  The Task Force brings together members of the business, industry, government and environmental consulting communities to create a plan of action for the state of Wisconsin that addresses issues related to climate change.1

Wisconsin's State Budget Outlook: The Worst is Yet to Come

Richard Chandler
January 1, 2011

Executive Summary

Teacher Licensure in Wisconsin: Who is Protected- Parents or the Education Establishment?

Mark Schug, Ph.D. and Scott Niederjohn, Ph.D.
February 1, 2011

Executive Summary

It has been 10 years since Wisconsin overhauled an old set of rules for state teacher licensure (PI 3 and PI 4) and replaced it with a new set called PI 34. At the time of its approval in 2000, PI 34 was warmly welcomed by state leaders and legislators from both sides of the aisle. It was praised as a way to create a new generation of Wisconsin teachers. 

The purpose of this report is to assess PI 34 in an effort to learn whether it has made good on these high expectations.

Accountability and Learning: Assessing the Seattle Families and Education Levy

Paul Guppy
February 1, 2011

Seattle school administrators are seeking approval of a fourth education levy in two years. Yet, education research shows spending more money will not improve learning for Seattle school children. If the Families and Education Levy is approved, school administrators will likely perceive it as a signal that no fundamental change is needed, and students in Seattle public schools will continue to experience poor educational results and a high drop-out rate.

Actual Pay: A Survey of Missouri Public School Superintendent Salary and Benefit Packages

Audrey Spalding
July 29, 2010

In this interesting paper, Show-Me Institute researcher Audrey Spalding analyzes a topic that has received little systematic study: the compensation of school superintendents. School superintendents are the CEOs of our public school districts. Missouri school districts spend roughly $ 9,500 per student in current operating expenses. This rises to nearly $ 13,000 per student when capital expenditures are included. Superintendents, with the approval of their boards, make important decisions about how these resources are allocated.

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